The lending gap narrows for women business owners, but it’s still 31% less than for men

Jason Cheng

CNBC March 7, 2019 By Rohit Arora Key Points The number of women-owned businesses that applied for funding in 2018 increased by 13 percent, according to an annual study of 30,000 companies nationwide by Biz2Credit. The Biz2Credit research found that the average size loan for women-owned businesses was 31 percent less than for male-owned businesses. Nearly 1 in 5 loan …

Nonprofits Led by People of Color Win Less Grant Money With More Strings (Study)

Jason Cheng

Organizations led by people of color win less grant money and are trusted less to make decisions about how to spend those funds than groups with white leaders, according to a new report by the consultancy Bridgespan and Echoing Green, an organization that invests in and provides support for leaders of emerging social enterprises.

The differences described in the report are sometimes stark. The authors analyzed three years of informational tax returns of 164 U.S. groups that were winners, finalists, or semifinalists in Echoing Green’s highly competitive fellowship program. They examined three years of funding data for each group that applied from 2012 to 2015 to determine funding levels and other available information. The authors found that white-led groups had budgets that were 24 percent larger than those led by people of color. It also found that groups led by black women received less money than those led by black men or white women.

Women leaders, a competitive edge in and after the crisis

Jason Cheng

This report provides a perspective on several levers that could raise the priority of gender diversity and increase the efforts to achieve it within organizations. The first one is to convince the skeptics of the benefits of having more women in top management: after all, there’s still a long way to go to persuade most executive boards and male business leaders of this. The second is to make gender diversity development a priority within organizations. The third lever is the most important for long-term effectiveness: implement appropriate programs. Based on our survey and our experience of companies that are highly committed to this issue, the success of gender diversity initiatives depends above all on deploying comprehensive programs that comprise a broad range of measures. It is not enough simply to provide more flexible working conditions or career management. Reaching a critical mass of women in the top management of organizations requires a critical mass of measures, if we want to create deep-seated and sustainable change.

The Remote Work Report by Zapier

Jason Cheng

Will the office be obsolete by 2030? Knowledge workers think so.
About three-quarters of knowledge workers would be willing to quit a job that didn’t allow remote working for one that did.

Companies looking to attract and retain talent should think about their remote work policies. 95 percent of U.S. knowledge workers want to work remotely, and 74 percent would be willing to quit a job to do so.

Women value remote work more than men, but are less likely to have the opportunity.

62 percent of female knowledge workers say the option to work remotely is one of the perks they would most want an employer to offer, as opposed to just 53 percent of male knowledge workers. And yet there are significant gender disparities: 40 percent of female knowledge workers say they don’t work remotely because their company doesn’t allow it, compared to 25 percent of men of the same group saying the same thing.

Read this before you have a baby (especially if you’re a woman)

Jason Cheng

It seems so obvious: having kids affects men and women differently. Sure, emotionally and financially but most clearly in the simple way mothers and fathers spend their time. And when you actually look at how 10,900 Americans carve up 24 hours, the conclusion is pretty stark: if you’re a woman who enjoys paid work or relaxing activities, having kids will cramp your style. Being married with kids also isn’t looking like a great idea according to the numbers.

Gender-balance Teams Linked to Better Business Performance: A Sodexo Study

Jason Cheng

Women remain underrepresented in leadership roles, in spite of research indicating that gender- balanced leadership has a positive impact on the bottom line.
However, gender balance impacts performance only when the optimal balance is reached.
The results of the Sodexo study confirm that this balance corresponds to a male-female ratio between 40% and 60%, reinforcing that diversity is key to enhanced performance.
Entities with gender-balanced management performed better on all of the performance indicators measured, including employee engagement, brand awareness, client retention and three indicators of financial performance.
Teams at Sodexo within the optimum gender- balanced zone have experienced on average an increase of four points in the global engagement rate versus only one point for other teams between 2010 and 2012.

Women at Work: Women’s Access to Power and the Gender Earnings Gap

Jason Cheng

Using a unique sample of 5,022 workers in 94 large German workplaces, the authors explore whether and how women’s access to higher level positions, firms’ human resources practices, and workers’ qualification levels are associated with gender differences in earnings. First, they find that having more women in management reduces the gender earnings gap for jobs with low qualifications, but not those with high qualifications. Second, they find that while men’s compensation is positively affected by having a male supervisor, women with a female supervisor do not receive such an advantage. Finally, they find that human resources practices and job-level qualifications moderate the association between gendered power and gender earnings inequalities. Integrating women into managerial and supervisory roles does not automatically reduce gender inequalities; its impacts are contingent on organizational context.

The Gender Wage Gap: Causes, Consequences, and Remedies

Jason Cheng

Women are almost half of the workforce, yet they are still getting pay less than men. They receive more college degree than men. Hispanic women and African American women get pay even less than men. For every 40 hours that Americans women work, they only get pay 80 cents for every dollar paid to men. Wage discrimination is a reality. Society needs to take a stand and fight for wages equality (NWLC.org). Although the equal pay act was implemented 50 years ago, women of every race and education level are still getting pay less than men. It only gets worse as women’s career progress. The wage gap possesses lots of negative impact on women and young girl who are growing up. It makes them feel less worthy and powerless. The gender gap should matter to everyone because it is a crucial issue that needs to be resolve because it can very be discouraging for women. After reviewing the data and pay gap between men and women, some questions begin to arise such as why do women get pay less than men, have less advantageous job than men? What can we, as, individuals, companies, women, and societies need do to change the pay gap that exists between men and women when we have the same qualifications as men? This Research aims to explore perceptions of the gender wage gap in a group of employees working in every industry. I found evidence that the gender wage gap persists and that feelings towards can demoralize employees in the workforce.

Accenture: Equality Equals Innovation Research Report (2019)

Jason Cheng

Accenture has found that a culture of equality—the same kind of workplace environment that helps everyone advance to higher positions—is a powerful multiplier of innovation and growth. Global gross domestic product would increase by up to US$8 trillion by 2028 if innovation mindset in all countries were raised by 10 percent. Diversity positively influences an innovation mindset, and equality is the multiplier. A culture of equality is anchored by three pillars: an Empowering Environment (one that trusts employees, respects individuals and offers freedom to be creative and to train and work flexibly), Bold Leadership (a diverse leadership team that sets, shares and measures equality targets openly), and Comprehensive Action (policies and practices that are family-friendly, support all genders and are bias- free in attracting and retaining people).

2018 Hersch – Valuing the Risk of Workplace Sexual Harassment

Jason Cheng

Valuing the risk of workplace sexual harassment

Using data on sexual harassment charges filed with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, Hersch calculates the risk of sexual harassment by gender, industry, and age and establish that white females, but not nonwhite females, receive a compensating wage differential for exposure to a higher risk of sexual harassment.