Better Together: A Model for Women and LGBTQ Equality in the Workplace

Sophie Bierly

Much has been achieved in terms of human rights for women and people of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transsexual, and queer (LGBTQ) community. However, human resources management (HRM) initiatives for gender equality in the workplace focus almost exclusively on white, heterosexual, cisgender women, leaving the problems of other gender, and social minorities out of the analysis. This article develops an integrative model of gender equality in the workplace for HRM academics and practitioners. First, it analyzes relevant antecedents and consequences of gender-based discrimination and harassment (GBDH) in the workplace. Second, it incorporates the feminist, queer, and intersectional perspectives in the analysis. Third, it integrates literature findings about women and the LGBTQ at work, making the case for an inclusive HRM. The authors underscore the importance of industry-university collaboration and offer a starters’ toolkit that includes suggestions for diagnosis, intervention, and applied research on GBDH. Finally, avenues for future research are identified to explore gendered practices that hinder the career development of women and the LGBTQ in the workplace.

Report Card on the Diversity of California’s Legal Profession

Hei-ock Kim

Having a diverse legal profession positively impacts the administration
of justice, ensures fairness, and promotes the rule of law. The mandate
to promote a diverse and inclusive legal profession is central to the State
Bar’s mission of public protection. The State Bar advances this aspect of its
mission in part by collecting, analyzing, and presenting data on California’s
licensed attorneys through an annual attorney census. This first annual
report card uses census data to provide a clear picture of the state of the
profession from a diversity and inclusion standpoint.
As the report card reflects, the profession has become increasingly
diverse in recent decades, with newly licensed attorneys better reflecting
California’s rich and varied demographics. However, much work remains.
The analyses below highlight areas of the legal profession where the
greatest opportunities for improvement exist. A Call to Action follows to
encourage employers and attorneys to influence and advance an inclusive
workplace that supports a more diverse workforce.

Women Shadowing a Man

My life got easier after top surgery. Is this what male privilege looks like?

Hei-ock

One other thing is clear. The inequality that women experience at work and in day to day interactions isn’t just in their heads. We need to recognize women’s work and women’s ideas. We need to be willing to envision a woman as president. I will keep fighting for women, no matter what body I inhabit.

Three People Sitting, Looking at an iPad

Resources for Women, Minorities, & Other Audiences

kendra

MyPerfectResume has created resources specifically set up to meet the needs or address the interests of various groups, such as women, persons of varied nationalities or ethnic backgrounds, and so on. The Riley Guide also provides pages of resources and information specifically intended for military personnel, ex-offenders and former felons, and disabled individuals – but there may be some overlap with those resources and the ones listed on this page. You’re certainly not limited to these resources, but they may have ideas or topics which speak directly to you. Even the resources listed under specific affinity groups may be useful to a broader audience. The Riley Guide’s page of Business & Employer Rankings also covers top employers for diversity groups.

Stephanie Huckel Talking at an Event

How to navigate the gender landscape at work

kendra

The Harvard Gazette February 15, 2019 By Robert Mitchell Queer. Some still bristle when they hear it, but in 2019, when used to describe a gay person, “queer” doesn’t carry the same pejorative connotations that it might have 25 or 30 years ago. Still, it’s important to know your audience before using it, said Stephanie Huckel, senior global program manager …

Business Impact of LGBT-Supportive Workplace Policies Cover

The Business Impact of LGBT-Supportive Workplace Policies

kendra

The “business case for diversity” suggests that such diversity in the workplace will lead to lower costs and/or higher revenues, improving the bottom line. Not surprisingly, employers have considered the economic benefits of adding lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT)-supportive policies, including sexual orientation and gender-identity nondiscrimination policies and domestic partner benefits policies.

Out & Equal Logo

Out & Equal: Workplace Advocates

kendra

Out & Equal’s work has long been about diversity and inclusion, and we’ve made great strides on that front. Now it’s time for us to evolve that work. From this moment on— our work will be about belonging. In its simplest form, diversity is about counting heads. We need a gay man, a Latina woman, a transgender veteran, a differently-abled …