Meet the Woman who Discovered a Whole New Type of Galaxy

Jason Cheng

Now a postdoctoral research associate at the University of Arizona’s Steward Observatory, Mutlu-Pakdil analyses data collected from telescopes to help unravel the mysteries of the universe—especially how galaxies form and change over time.

While Mutlu-Pakdil and her team continue to study the intriguing object, she hopes that her work and her story will inspire other immigrants and students, especially those from underrepresented communities.

This Computer Was an Astronomy Star: Charlotte Moore Sitterly

Jason Cheng

Computer used to be a job title, referring to a person who performed calculations on behalf of higher-ups who didn’t want to churn through data for hours or weeks at a time. In the early 20th century, most computers were women. (In the 1940s, one wag suggested we use the term kilogirl as a measure of digital computing power, where one kilogirl equals 1,000 hours of labor.) In 1920, a 22-year-old named Charlotte Moore, after dazzling the mathematics department at Swarthmore College, joined Princeton’s Department of Astronomy as a computer. She rose to astronomy’s highest ranks, a solar specialist who published five monographs and more than 85 papers.

Ellen Ochoa Was The First Latina To Go To Space, Now She Shares Her Top Career Lessons

Jason Cheng

In 1993, Ellen Ochoa became the first Latina to travel to space after a career in STEM that built up to that moment and yet one of her top career lessons comes from a different part of her life.
“From my Marine friends, I learned to keep focus on two things: (1) accomplish the mission and (2) take care of your people,” shares Ochoa. “If you do #2 well, then your team will take of #1.”
As she thinks back on the things that helped her when exploring a career in STEM, particularly during a time when diversity was less present, Ochoa credits professors who mentored her and helped her visualize the future she wanted for herself and encourages Latinas at the start of their careers to do the same.

Most Wikipedia Profiles Are of Men. This Scientist Is Changing That.

kendra

Jessica Wade has added nearly 700 Wikipedia biographies for important female and minority scientists in less than two years. “Our science can only benefit the whole of society if it’s done by the whole of society.” — Dr. Jessica Wade, a physicist who adds biographies of female and minority scientists to Wikipedia daily Fewer than 20 percent of biographies on Wikipedia in English are of women, …

Reset: My Fight for Inclusion and Lasting Change by Ellen Pao

kendra

In 2015, Ellen K. Pao sued a powerhouse Silicon Valley venture capital firm, calling out workplace discrimination and retaliation against women and other underrepresented groups. Her suit rocked the tech world. Though Pao lost her suit, she revolutionized the conversation at tech offices, in the media, and around the world. In Reset, she tells her full story for the first time.

Leading by example to close the gender pay gap

Hei-ock Kim

Unequal pay between men and women is a persistent problem in the United States. Salesforce, a tech company with 30,000 employees, is doing its part to change that 60 Minutes April 15, 2018 By Lesley Stahl The “Me Too” movement has shaken the workplace to its core. It has such power that it has come to mean more than sexual …

AI programs exhibit racial and gender biases, research reveals

Hei-ock Kim

The Guardian April 13, 2017 Hannah Devlin An artificial intelligence tool that has revolutionised the ability of computers to interpret everyday language has been shown to exhibit striking gender and racial biases. The findings raise the spectre of existing social inequalities and prejudices being reinforced in new and unpredictable ways as an increasing number of decisions affecting our everyday lives …

This could close the gender pay gap in 27 years

Hei-ock Kim

CNN Money March 7, 2017 By Kathryn Vasel The gender pay gap has persisted for generations, but the end could be in sight for young women. Pay equity could be achieved in developed markets by 2044, according to new research released by Accenture on Tuesday. That’s 36 years earlier than previous estimates of 2080, and means women who graduate in …

Female Alumni of Top Colleges Still Make Less Money Than Men From Non-Selective Schools

Hei-ock Kim

Slate February 16, 2017 By Christina Cauterucci Male alumni of elite universities can expect a substantial salary advantage over peers from less selective institutions. But the gender wage gap is wide enough to put women who graduated from even the country’s best colleges behind men who graduated from the least selective ones. In a recent study published in Social Science …