What Works: Gender Equality by Design Book Cover

What Works: Gender Equality by Design

Jason Cheng

What Works is built on new insights into the human mind. It draws on data collected by companies, universities, and governments in Australia, India, Norway, the United Kingdom, the United States, Zambia, and other countries, often in randomized controlled trials. It points out dozens of evidence-based interventions that could be adopted right now and demonstrates how research is addressing gender bias, improving lives and performance. What Works shows what more can be done—often at shockingly low cost and surprisingly high speed.

The Deadliest Toxins Artwork

Why Diversity Programs Fail

Jason Cheng

The numbers sum it up. Your organization will become less diverse, not more, if you require managers to go to diversity training, try to regulate their hiring and promotion decisions, and put in a legalistic grievance system.

The very good news is that we know what does work—we just need to do more of it.

COVID-19: How Business Can Support Women in Times of Crisis

Jason Cheng

Many of the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic are hitting women disproportionately hard. Women are more likely than men to work in low-paying, insecure and informal jobs. Women also make up the majority of health professionals and essential workers at the frontlines of the COVID-19 response, risking their health and safety, as well as those of their families.

Woman in the Workplace 2019 Report Cover

Women in the Workplace 2019

Jason Cheng

This year, 329 companies employing more than 13 million people shared their pipeline data or completed a survey of their HR practices. In addition, more than 68,500 employees were surveyed on their workplace experiences, and we interviewed women and men of different races and ethnicities, LGBTQ women and men, and women with disabilities at all levels in their organizations
for additional insights.

Our 2019 findings build on our data from the last four years, as well as similar research conducted by McKinsey & Company in 2012.

Woman in the Workplace 2018 Report Cover

Women in the Workplace 2018

Jason Cheng

For the last four years, companies have reported that they are highly committed to gender diversity. But that commitment has not translated into meaningful progress.

Women continue to be vastly underrepresented at every level. For women of color, it’s even worse. Only about one in five senior leaders is a woman, and one in twenty-five is a woman of color.

Progress isn’t just slow—it’s stalled. And we know why.

Women in the Workplace 2016 Report Cover

Women in the Workplace 2016

Jason Cheng

In corporate America, women fall behind early and continue to lose ground with every step

Mentors Vs. Sponsors Comparison

The Key Role of Sponsorship

Jason Cheng

According to research from the Center for Talent Innovation (CTI), the vast majority of women (85%) and
multicultural professionals (81%) need navigational support to advance in their careers but receive it less
often than Caucasian men. However, a 2010 Catalyst study revealed that more women than men have been
assigned mentors yet 15% more men won promotions. Why? The findings indicate that having more
mentorship did not lead to advancement but having a senior mentor in a position to provide sponsorship did.
What is the difference between having a mentor or having a sponsor?
In short, mentors advise you and sponsors advocate for you.

McKinsey & Company

Women leaders, a competitive edge in and after the crisis

Jason Cheng

This report provides a perspective on several levers that could raise the priority of gender diversity and increase the efforts to achieve it within organizations. The first one is to convince the skeptics of the benefits of having more women in top management: after all, there’s still a long way to go to persuade most executive boards and male business leaders of this. The second is to make gender diversity development a priority within organizations. The third lever is the most important for long-term effectiveness: implement appropriate programs. Based on our survey and our experience of companies that are highly committed to this issue, the success of gender diversity initiatives depends above all on deploying comprehensive programs that comprise a broad range of measures. It is not enough simply to provide more flexible working conditions or career management. Reaching a critical mass of women in the top management of organizations requires a critical mass of measures, if we want to create deep-seated and sustainable change.

The Gender-Balanced Zone Graph, Showing the Positive Effects

Gender-balance Teams Linked to Better Business Performance: A Sodexo Study

Jason Cheng

Women remain underrepresented in leadership roles, in spite of research indicating that gender- balanced leadership has a positive impact on the bottom line.
However, gender balance impacts performance only when the optimal balance is reached.
The results of the Sodexo study confirm that this balance corresponds to a male-female ratio between 40% and 60%, reinforcing that diversity is key to enhanced performance.
Entities with gender-balanced management performed better on all of the performance indicators measured, including employee engagement, brand awareness, client retention and three indicators of financial performance.
Teams at Sodexo within the optimum gender- balanced zone have experienced on average an increase of four points in the global engagement rate versus only one point for other teams between 2010 and 2012.

A Woman and Man, Each Standing on their own Pedestal, with the Man Higher than then Woman

The Gender Wage Gap: Causes, Consequences, and Remedies

Jason Cheng

Women are almost half of the workforce, yet they are still getting pay less than men. They receive more college degree than men. Hispanic women and African American women get pay even less than men. For every 40 hours that Americans women work, they only get pay 80 cents for every dollar paid to men. Wage discrimination is a reality. Society needs to take a stand and fight for wages equality (NWLC.org). Although the equal pay act was implemented 50 years ago, women of every race and education level are still getting pay less than men. It only gets worse as women’s career progress. The wage gap possesses lots of negative impact on women and young girl who are growing up. It makes them feel less worthy and powerless. The gender gap should matter to everyone because it is a crucial issue that needs to be resolve because it can very be discouraging for women. After reviewing the data and pay gap between men and women, some questions begin to arise such as why do women get pay less than men, have less advantageous job than men? What can we, as, individuals, companies, women, and societies need do to change the pay gap that exists between men and women when we have the same qualifications as men? This Research aims to explore perceptions of the gender wage gap in a group of employees working in every industry. I found evidence that the gender wage gap persists and that feelings towards can demoralize employees in the workforce.