Hollywood working moms and the brutal conflict between family and career

Jason Cheng

Nearly every mother in Hollywood has a horror story.

There was the time screenwriter and showrunner Aline Brosh McKenna was 8½ months pregnant and a studio executive joked, “I guess today would be a bad day to punch you in the stomach.” There was the time Nisha Ganatra, director of the upcoming Mindy Kaling film “Late Night,” went on a scouting trip to India when she was a new mom and found herself driving around the country in a van “with 15 dudes,” pumping breast milk in “a woodshed in the middle of a desert and an outhouse behind a restaurant.” There was the time a dream job offer fell through for Oscar-nominated “Mudbound” cinematographer Rachel Morrison because producers panicked that she’d be going back to work a few weeks after giving birth — something she was willing to do to help realize one of the most exciting scripts she had ever read. The experience, she says, “made me acutely aware of the prejudices in this industry, specifically in my line of work.”

Read this before you have a baby (especially if you’re a woman)

Jason Cheng

It seems so obvious: having kids affects men and women differently. Sure, emotionally and financially but most clearly in the simple way mothers and fathers spend their time. And when you actually look at how 10,900 Americans carve up 24 hours, the conclusion is pretty stark: if you’re a woman who enjoys paid work or relaxing activities, having kids will cramp your style. Being married with kids also isn’t looking like a great idea according to the numbers.

Boot Camp for New Dads

kendra

Boot Camp for New Dads® (aka Daddy Boot Camp®) is a unique father-to-father, community-based workshop that inspires and equips men of different economic levels, ages and cultures to become confidently engaged with their infants, support their mates and personally navigate their transformation into dads.

Mapping Gender: Shedding Empirical Light on Family Courts’ Treatment of Cases Involving Abuse and Alienation

kendra

This article provides a brief literature survey, focusing on the theory of “parental alienation” which operates as a primary vehicle for making abuse invisible in custody litigation. This Article reports on the co-authors’ pilot study, which begins empirically mapping family courts’ uses of this theory. These pilot results provide preliminary empirical support for the critiques from the field.

Millennial Men Aren’t the Dads They Thought They’d Be

Ruby Lynn

The New York Times July 30, 2015 By Claire Cain Miller Young men today have aspirations of being hands-on fathers as well as breadwinners — supportive husbands who also do dishes. But as they enter that more responsibility-filled stage of life, something changes: Their roles often become much more traditional. Millennial men — ages 18 to early 30s — have …

Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls

kendra

“Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls” is a children’s book packed with 100 bedtime stories about the life of 100 extraordinary women from the past and the present, illustrated by 60 female artists from all over the world. Each woman’s story is written in the style of a fairy tale. Each story has a full-page, full-color portrait that captures the …

As More New Dads Get Paternity Leave, Companies Push Them to Take It

Hei-ock Kim

As more companies offer new fathers more paid time off, a new challenge has emerged—persuading working dads to actually take advantage of it.
At some companies, new fathers get advice from older colleagues to take their full paid leave; ‘If you don’t take it, it’s borderline idiotic,’ one manager said

Will millennial men keep their wives from career success?

Hei-ock Kim

Fortune November 18, 2014 By Ben Geier There’s a disconnect, it seems, in a lot of young American families. Just who is going to take care of the kids? According to a recent study by the Harvard Business Review, 66% of millennial men expect their partner to take the primary responsibility for raising children. On the other hand, only 42% …

Doc McStuffins

Hei-ock Kim

Doc McStuffins (also known as Doc McStuffins: Toy Hospital in the fourth season) is an American animated children’s television series produced by Brown Bag Films. It was created and executive produced by Chris Nee and premiered on March 23, 2012, on Disney Channel and Disney Junior. The series is about a girl who can “fix” toys, with help from her toy friends. It features songs written and composed by Kay Hanley and Michelle Lewis. Reruns air on Disney Channel and Disney Junior.

The series received positive reviews due to the show’s concept and the main character, as well as its portrayal of African-Americans (Nee stated in 2013 that Doc is African-American, proposed by Disney during her initial pitch, Nee initially only knowing she wanted a girl doctor) in a Disney series. Chris Nee describes the series as “Cheers for Preschoolers.”

On November 16, 2016, the series was renewed for a fifth season by Disney Junior. On April 4, 2018, Lara Jill Miller, the voice of Lambie, said that the final episode of the final season has been recorded, ending the show after five seasons. (from Wikipedia)

The Key to Gender Equality Isn’t in the Workplace or the White House—It’s at Home

Hei-ock Kim

The Daily Beast February 14, 2017 By Keli Goff Since the landmark Women’s March on Washington (and other major cities), there has been endless discussion of whether the protests will have lasting influence, or simply be one moment in history that fades away. There has also been ongoing debate about what would constitute meaningful advancement for women in the era …