Native Women Lead

Sophie Bierly

OUR MISSION To revolutionize systems and inspire innovation by investing in Native Women in business. We do this by co-creating with and convening our community to build coalition while honoring our culture, creativity, and connections

National Latina Business Women Association – San Diego

Sophie Bierly

The National Latina Business Women Association (NLBWA-SD) was established in 2004. It was created to meet the needs of the growing community of Latina Entrepreneurs, Executives and Professionals.

NLBWA-SD believes in “Investing in Latinas” and has developed business networking, membership programs & benefits for its members, including monthly meetings (mixers, breakfasts, seminars &luncheons) all held at a centrally located and unique venue with incredible speakers and panelists.

Black Women’s Network

Sophie Bierly

Since 1979, Black Women’s Network has been a beacon in the greater Los Angeles metropolitan business community that unites and welcomes urban professionals by offering inspiring networking, volunteering and mentoring opportunities to support black female business, career and professional development within a supportive nonpartisan and nonsectarian environment.

Asian American Women’s Alliance (AAWA)

Sophie Bierly

AAWA seeks to create opportunities for mutual learning & nurturing, mentor relationships, career & leadership development, personal & group support, and engagement in community services.

National Professional Women of Color Network

Sophie Bierly

The National Professional Women of Color Network (PWOCN) empowers women of color through networking. Our mission is to serve as a resource for your professional and personal advancement and whether you are a career woman or woman owned business, the goal is the same – advancing your business or career through the use of the network!

PWOCN is the Premiere Multicultural Networking Organization for Women of Color. We are comprised of professional women from many industry sectors and are growing larger each day. PWOCN connects tremendous women with one another and members are translating those connections into Phenomenal Business Success.

Strategic Connections Circle – Get connected to the product, service or member you need through select gatherings. Join in with other entrepreneurs & career women for exchange, advice, mentoring and partnership.

Networking Events – Discounted entry to networking events and an opportunity to be recognized as a charter member.

Member Spotlight Option – Special opportunity to be showcased in PWOCN member spotlight.

Online Web Listing – Join our featured Premiere Charter Member page on PWOCN website. Listing includes photo, contact information and link to website.

Professional Development – Online and live trainings focused on leadership, career coaching and business mastery.

Scientist June Almeida, operating an Electron Microscope in 1963

She discovered coronaviruses decades ago—but got little recognition

Hei-ock

WHEN JUNE ALMEIDA peered into her electron microscope in 1964, she saw a round, grey dot covered in tiny spokes. She and her colleagues noted that the pegs formed a halo around the virus—much like the sun’s corona.

What she saw would become known as the coronavirus, and Almeida played a pivotal role in identifying it. That feat was all the more remarkable because the 34-year-old scientist never completed her formal education.

Mentors Vs. Sponsors Comparison

The Key Role of Sponsorship

Hei-ock

According to research from the Center for Talent Innovation (CTI), the vast majority of women (85%) and
multicultural professionals (81%) need navigational support to advance in their careers but receive it less
often than Caucasian men. However, a 2010 Catalyst study revealed that more women than men have been
assigned mentors yet 15% more men won promotions. Why? The findings indicate that having more
mentorship did not lead to advancement but having a senior mentor in a position to provide sponsorship did.
What is the difference between having a mentor or having a sponsor?
In short, mentors advise you and sponsors advocate for you.

McKinsey & Company

Women leaders, a competitive edge in and after the crisis

Hei-ock

This report provides a perspective on several levers that could raise the priority of gender diversity and increase the efforts to achieve it within organizations. The first one is to convince the skeptics of the benefits of having more women in top management: after all, there’s still a long way to go to persuade most executive boards and male business leaders of this. The second is to make gender diversity development a priority within organizations. The third lever is the most important for long-term effectiveness: implement appropriate programs. Based on our survey and our experience of companies that are highly committed to this issue, the success of gender diversity initiatives depends above all on deploying comprehensive programs that comprise a broad range of measures. It is not enough simply to provide more flexible working conditions or career management. Reaching a critical mass of women in the top management of organizations requires a critical mass of measures, if we want to create deep-seated and sustainable change.