Women in the Workplace 2021

programs

Women in the Workplace1 is the largest study on the state of women in corporate America. This year, we collected information from 423 participating organizations employing 12 million people, surveyed more than 65,000 employees, and conducted interviews with women of diverse identities, including women of color,2 LGBTQ+ women, and women with disabilities. Our 2021 findings focus on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and the growing emphasis on diversity, equity, and inclusion on the experiences of women and the state of work more broadly.

The 2019 State of Women Owned Businesses Report

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To better understand how the economic growth of the past few years has influenced the dynamism of women-owned businesses, the 2019 State of Women-Owned Businesses Report compared 2019 to 2014 and 2018. The report looks at trends in the number of firms, employment and revenue across various factors, including but not limited to, the following: Nationally, Race and ethnicity, Sidepreneur, Company size, Industry, State, Top 50, metropolitan areas

2022 Small Business Trends

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Each year, Guidant reaches out to the resilient, hardworking small business owners of America. We learn who they are, what their lives as small business owners are like, what their plans for the future are, and how their business has weathered current affairs. Together, this information makes up the Small Business Trends report.

Stop Telling Women They Have Imposter Syndrome

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“Imposter syndrome,” or doubting your abilities and feeling like a fraud at work, is a diagnosis often given to women. But the fact that it’s considered a diagnosis at all is problematic. The concept, whose development in the ‘70s excluded the effects of systemic racism, classism, xenophobia, and other biases, took a fairly universal feeling of discomfort, second-guessing, and mild anxiety in the workplace and pathologized it, especially for women. The answer to overcoming imposter syndrome is not to fix individuals, but to create an environment that fosters a number of different leadership styles and where diversity of racial, ethnic, and gender identities is viewed as just as professional as the current model.

Women in Hospitality, Travel, and Leisure 2020 WiH2020 Review

Samaria Avila

In 2017 a group of leaders and opinion formers across hospitality, travel and leisure decided to take action to accelerate progress towards an inclusive culture within our industry and seize the opportunity to come together as an industry to amplify the
impact of individual initiatives. We want as many companies as possible to sign up to The Diversity in Hospitality, Travel and Leisure Charter and actively contribute to making a difference in this area.

Lending Discrimination During Covid-19: Black and Hispanic Women-Owned Businesses

Samaria Avila

NCRC, in collaboration with our academic partners, conducted 60 pre-application mystery shopper tests by telephone with 47 different financial institutions in the Los Angeles, California, metropolitan statistical area (MSA) from July 27 to August 7, 2020, during the last two weeks that federal Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loans were available to businesses impacted by the coronavirus pandemic. This study was to determine if financial institutions changed their behaviors after being made aware of our previous testing conducted in the Washington, D.C., MSA. The results of that testing were widely reported by the media, including The New York Times, Politico, The Hill and ABC News. The follow-up tests in Los Angeles revealed a combined 21 out of 60 (35%) tests where the White tester was favored over either or both of the Black and Hispanic Testers in violation of the Equal Credit Opportunity Act (ECOA) of 1974. For this round of testing, we conducted 60 multi-layered matched tests which consisted of a Hispanic, Black and White tester each contacting the same financial institution to request information. Thirty of these multi-layered matched tests were conducted by female testers and thirty by male testers. We tested 60 branches from 47 different financial institutions including some national institutions that we had tested in Washington, D.C., during the first round.

Gender Inequalities in Construction Sector

Samaria Avila

Despite of a huge range of equality initiative and legislation, the construction sector is one of the vast male
dominated industries. Women were under-represented in all construction profession and occupation. Current literature
explains the challenges and problems faced by woman who work in construction sector including structural barriers and
cultural barriers, such as and discrimination and harassment, limited working opportunities and longer inconvenient
working hours which results in high levels of stress for women and poor career prospects. The results problemize current
policy recommendations that female have several skills that can be bring to this industry (such as co-operation). These
policies strengthen the gendered characters of the construction industry’s fail and habitus to recognize how the
underlying practices and structures of the sector reproduce gendered practices.